Diana Nyad Breaks World Record, When She Was Sixty-Four, while using songs as TICKET TO RIDE to Maintain Winning Mood | Meanspeed Tempo Graphs Illustrate the Power of the Speed of the Mind of the Athlete

Diana Nyad swam from Cuba to the United States on her fourth try.  She was 64 years old when she accomplished this previously impossible-to-do feat.

Ms. Nyad has a “psyche list” of songs that she would hum in her head to keep her swimming through the pain.  The Beatles’ TICKET TO RIDE was her favorite.

Sports-Tempo-Psychology-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-meanspeed-post-map-022667
Sports-Tempo-Psychology-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-meanspeed-post-map-022667
TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Time-Map
TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Time-Map
Diana-Nyad-psyche-song-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map_020562
Diana-Nyad-psyche-song-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map_020562
Diana-Nyad-psyche-song-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map_040998
Diana-Nyad-psyche-song-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map_040998
Tempo-Graph-Diana-Nyad-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map-bpm-tempo
Tempo-Graph-Diana-Nyad-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map-bpm-tempo
Diana-Nyad-psyche-song-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map_012163
Diana-Nyad-psyche-song-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map_012163
Diana-Nyad-psyche-song-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map_122585
Diana-Nyad-psyche-song-TICKET-TO-RIDE-Beatles-Meanspeed-Map_122585
DIANA NYAD Swim For Relief NYC - He...
DIANA NYAD Swim For Relief NYC – Herald Square, Manhattan NYC – 10/09/2013 (Photo credit: asterix611)

Wrecking Ball | Miley Cyrus | Tempo Breakdown – Frequencies, Meanspeed Maps, YouTube Embed

Wrecking_Ball  | Miley Cyrus | meanspeed_tempo_map_3
Wrecking_Ball | Miley Cyrus | meanspeed_tempo_map_3
Wrecking_Ball  | Miley Cyrus | meanspeed_tempo_map_2
Wrecking_Ball | Miley Cyrus | meanspeed_tempo_map_2
speed-spread-sheet-wrecking-ball
speed-spread-sheet-wrecking-ball
Wrecking_Ball  | Miley Cyrus | meanspeed_tempo_map_1
Wrecking_Ball | Miley Cyrus | meanspeed_tempo_map_1

Giants Stadium gets the wrecking Ball

Wrecking_Ball  | Miley Cyrus | meanspeed_tempo_map_4
Wrecking_Ball | Miley Cyrus | meanspeed_tempo_map_4

Meanspeed® Summary
mean speed/median expected tempo=60.1 beats per minute
average beat=998.3 milliseconds
performer=Miley Cyrus, wil.i.am
songs within 1% of WRECKING BALL-

“That’s What Friends Are For,” Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight, Elton John, Burt Bacharach

“Taxi,” Harry Chapin

“Nothing Compares 2 U,” Sinead O’Connor

Many Too Many,” Genesis

“My Love,” Paul McCartney

“I Can’t Make You Love Me (If You Don’t)” Bonnie Raitte featuring Bruce Hornsby

Goodbye Yellow Brick Road,” Elton John

Ian A Schneider
Meanspeed® Music
October 11, 2013

English: Miley Cyrus on the Red Carpet at Vh1 ...
English: Miley Cyrus on the Red Carpet at Vh1 Divas 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Best Coach of Teams and Mixtapes? #SOTD by Pete Carroll as Seattle Seahawks tempo of James Brown, “Make It Funky (Parts1-4)” – The Rare YouTube Video Actually Used By The Coach, The Speeds, Tempo Graphic

January 7, 2030 the song “Make It Funky” by the late performer James Brown is the first step in “Mixtape Coach” Peter Carroll of the Seattle Seahawks as his team will take on the Atlanta, far south and far east of Seattle, the entire week to make James Brown and his songs of the day (#SOTD’s online) all week in preparation for the game on Sunday.  Today he got off with the James Brown song called make it funky which is about 12 minutes and 40 seconds long and house by quarter knowledge 1,232
Make It Funky - tempo chart - James Brown - sandy silverman school - meanspeed music line chart_red
Make It Funky – tempo chart – James Brown – sandy silverman school – meanspeed chart_red
Make It Funky - tempo chart - James Brown - sandy silverman school - meanspeed music line chart
Make It Funky – tempo chart – James Brown l – meanspeed music line chart
median expected tempo/meanspeed=98 beats per minutes
average time of a quarter note=0.61234 seconds
corresponding tone=418 Hertz
Yesterday, the Seattle Seahawks defeated the Washington Redskins, 24 to 14. By beating the Atlanta Falcons, who excel at home in Georgia’s Dome with Matt Ryan at quarterback, the Seattle Seahawks would advance NFC championship in the game versus the winner of the San Francisco versus Green Bay game. Seattle against Atlanta is on Fox® TV on Sunday at 1 PM.
songs that are almost saying there within 1% of the Make It Funky by James Brown are:
“Eminence Front,” The Who
“Baby, Baby,” Amy Grant
“Brass In Pocket,”The Pretenders
“Tonight, Tonight, Tonight,” Genesis
“I Want You Back,” The Jackson Five
“Walk On By,” Dionne Warwick
Pete Carroll, “The Zen Doctor Coach of Mixtapes” to many who have covered him, has won multi-ESPN awards in regard to music and sports and coaching.  The coach of the Seattle Seahawks, now Carroll was once the assistant coach of the New York Jets and the was head coach of the The New England Patriots then in college with the University of Southern California Los Angeles and the past few years he’s been the coach the Seattle Seahawks.  This year has been a shocker.  I have always been an admirer of Coach Carroll so look for more James this week.

BY BELOW

9h Liam MartinLiam Martin@liam_204

@JimTothCJOB@PeteCarroll: We’ve got James Brown #SOTD‘s all week since we’re heading to Georgia! “Make it funky” http://winfo.re/13dYKKg ”

9h phyllisthemissionary phyllisthemissionary@pthemissionary

CONGRATS! RT @PeteCarroll We’ve got James Brown #SOTD‘s all week since we’re heading to Georgia! Today: “Make it funky” http://winfo.re/13dYKKg

We’ve got James Brown #SOTD‘s all week since we’re heading to Georgia! Today: “Make it funky” http://winfo.re/13dYKKg

Sting: WHY SHOULD I CRY FOR YOU? – Meanspeed® Music Public Education Breaks Down Speed/Tempo elements, bpm graphs, tempo maps & YouTube video for Sting's "finest song" according to drummer and singer PHIL COLLINS & Stylus Magazine's Mallory O'Donnell weighs in.

Sting - Why Should I Cry For You - mean speed tempo graph -10 trials
Sting – Why Should I Cry For You – mean speed tempo graph -10 trials

Sting – Why Should I Cry for You?

Sting - Why Should I Cry For You - mean speed tempo graph -scatter
Sting – Why Should I Cry For You – mean speed tempo graph -scatter

Descriptions about performers’ motives for songs and the lives that they have led is very difficult to come by.  Even if I could talk to Sting and he talked out his motives or emotions when he wrote and performed WHY SHOULD I CRY FOR YOU, he might be the first person to say, “I have thought about that motive for 15 years, and the album was dedication to my dad, I do not even know myself” where that beat comes from.”   The unique nature of the rhythmic drive in the song features two versions of the songs linked to YouTube below.  I know, I know – since the original publication of this article (“post””?) one has to go to YouTube* itself, and no, ya may not come back, and yes, there are plenty of versions of  the song wherein embedding them would be easy  – but doing same would not give you the chance to listen to what I found the most illustrative, by sound: the original video and the MTV unplugged version.  And if you like the charts on this page enough to download, there’s always that “back” thing!  I’m joking and I’m not – because for now they are here to download, but just as the videos was freely embeddable, the record company people have to eat and Sting has to eat so it’s more than fair to have the videos online at all to be seen on demand for free.  Those people who are 100 years old as myself remember that the idea of such privilege would be laughed off.  Then again, if I lose too much traffic: who cares?!  This site has high density bandwidth and I appreciate the way WORDPRESS® provides this as one of their hundreds of free templates – so it’s good for everyone.  I love  it when someone say, “I never would have liked that song” or “you turned me onto that band” as much as “now that I understand speed I’m in mental control.”  The idea is not to love every song at a speed that you prefer.  The idea is WAY simpler than that: if I’m going to steal your 5 minutes (some of you are on uh, all day – don’t worry, I do not have your ISP’s.  I used to have them, and if WORDPRESS® starts going all TSA (not a term when this was written), then I have no choice other than to privatize the page, which is still 35 more people who can see this material than would otherwise see it, and in pre-internet days that is actually not too bad.  Anyway, as per Sting’s motive or his emotion in writing, performing or producing the song – I sent a letter of inquiry, which went into a pile of 500000 other pieces of SNAIL MAIL which never got opened.  And I appreciate how cool the people noted and contributing to this article FOR EDUCATIONAL AND MENTAL HEALTH nonprofit purpose: mo one in the year 2011 is going to pay for lists of numbers.  You get the right list of numbers you win the lottery.  As far as the material Just kidding.  Anyway, as to the song, with honor I defer to MALLORY O’DONNELL, an excellent British journalist – the rest of the article is as it was in 1990, long before tempo maps created by elemental spread sheets – it was just the tempo range itself as expressed in the most common way, “BPM,” or beat per minute.  Ms O’DONNELL’s excellent piece includes:

Stylus Magazine’s Seconds column examines those magic moments that arise when listening to a piece of music that strikes that special chord inside. That pounding drum intro; a clanging guitar built-up to an anthemic chorus; that strange glitchy noise you’ve never been able to figure out; that first kiss or heartbreak; a well-turned rhyme that reminds you of something in your own past so much, it seems like it was written for you—all of those little things that make people love music. Every music lover has a collection of these Seconds in his or her head; these are some of ours.

The artist-not-formerly-known-as Gordon Sumner might well be the easiest of all soft targets for criticism, whether he’s getting lined up for punches from dubious hipster-types who’ve learned the hard way that they can no longer fuck with Elton John, or merely being called out for obvious chinks in his ideological armor (see the infamous “rain forest guitar”). But while the peanut gallery might enjoy setting Sting up for a fall, they remain oblivious to exactly why he’s so ready to take another kick at Lucy’s pigskin.

What makes Sting such a likely scapegoat in the adult-contemporary victimization sweepstakes is the same thing that casts him in a heroic light for those who aren’t particularly offended when their Dad likes the same music they do. Sting’s peculiar genius (nope, not a typo) as a lyricist and songwriter consists in reclaiming the poetic aphorisms of English Lit. 101 and returning them to an audience that read Milton in high school but couldn’t quite separate the juicy bits from the dry ones. The lyrics to “Why Should I Cry for You?” are scattered with a veritable army of Penguin Classics clichés: “for all my days remaining,” “asleep on the ocean’s bed,” “over a godless sea,” “all colors bleed to red,” “the stars seem to lose their place,” etc. This doesn’t make Sting any more of a thief than any number of songwriters. It’s simply that his appropriations are stretched so far back in time, so primal, that the material he’s ganking [sic] may as well be public domain.

The Soul Cages, the album for which “Why Should I Cry for You?” serves as conceptual mid-point, is the lynchpin of Sting’s complex, fecund, and oft-irritating solo career. Famously a tribute to his departed parents, whose funerals he famously didn’t attend, it arrived not-so-famously a full four years after their joint cancer-related deaths. It sold neither as well as his first two efforts, nor most of his later, more dubious ones. Yet it has more to commend it than condemn it, and its relative heaviness may just be the reason his latter work seems so determinedly light. A concept album in all but name, its nautical, religious, and emotional themes are grounded in Sumner’s family story, with his usual helping of British historical, liturgical, and sociological references dashed atop. But for all the college-kid line-deciphering provoked by “All this Time” (it’s about London) or “The Soul Cages” (a decidedly Grecian hell), “Why Should I Cry for You” calls only for a feeling heart and a tolerance for a bit of poetic recycling.

The production of “Why Should I Cry for You” is stylish, but far too populist to be “refined.” Sting utilizes unimpeachable session players to elucidate his existential dilemma: “What would be true?” He’s smart enough to have not come up with an answer and dumb (read “human”) enough to go on looking for one, so the accompaniment places texture over melodiousness. Crystalline, almost New Age synths drape a stately procession of organic, oceanic whoops and cries and a repeated guitar figure, evoking the toil of “hauling on frozen ropes” and the dreariness of “drifting on empty seas.” A pattern of deftly woven drums builds, but Sting remains ruminative, almost unmoved. He contemplates, he ponders, he questions again and again, yet he still gets precisely nowhere. His query is so profound that it eliminates any other subject but himself at times (“Why must I? / Why should I?”), make of this what you will. The fulcrum of the argument is still as clear as sunlight reflecting off an iceberg: to what do we owe those no longer with us? “Why should I cry for you / Why would you want me to / And what would it mean to say / That ‘I loved you in my fashion?'”

Whether Sumner is talking about deceased family or departed lovers, it’s clear that the self-reflexiveness of all this roaming over godless seas and keeping of arctic fires alight serves the questioner much more so than the one provoking all the questions. Pop music is filled with countless affirmations of undying love and never-ending fealty, but it rarely allows itself to address the consequences of these enviable pronouncements. Within the context of an album bent on grappling with one of the most difficult challenges a person can face, Sting provides us with an uneasy answer—no answer at all. Adult? I’ll vouch for that. Contemporary? Well, it damn sure still applies.

Exactly what was the problem again?

Why Should I Cry For You is a sing at the speed of solitude according to the meanspeed music theory. As the leader oif the meanspeed movement, I try to present songs in a fun way and say positive thing about them.

Then you get people as there are at STYLUS online. I will not say anything else about this most EXCELLENT piece of journalism.

How about speed? Songs at the speed of 79-84 bpm are almost always predictive of a song of stinging (sorry) solitude. Ms. O’Donnell really hits the nail on the head!

Sting - Why Should I Cry For You - mean speed tempo graph
Sting – Why Should I Cry For You – mean speed tempo graph

Meanspeed-Spencer Summary
performer=Sting
composer=Sting
album=The Soul Cages
File Type=m4p
Source iTunes® by Apple® with it’s leader Steve Jobs, “The World’s Greatest Software man”™
mean speed/average expected tempo=81 bpm
average beat=741 milliseconds

Sting - Why Should I Cry For You - mean speed tempo graph Niagra Falls
Sting – Why Should I Cry For You – mean speed tempo graph Niagra Falls

Ian Andrew Schneider

Meanspeed Music Education

July 30, 2009

---------------------------------PLEASE NOTE---------------------------------
This file is the author's own work and represents their interpretation of the
song. You may only use this file for private study, scholarship, or research.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 <9403151548.AA02266@etlxd42k>
To: jamesb@nevada.edu
Subject: CRD: Why Should I Cry For You - Sting

>From sd021@diana.di.fc.ul.pt (SDII-Grupo_sd021)
Subject: CRD: Sting: Why Should I Cry For You

Why Should I cry for you?  -  Sting  from "Soul Cages" album
                              Transcription: Luis Ferreira

{ If you want to play with the record, capo on 1st fret }

G
Fsus2  C  G
Gadd9  G
Gadd9  G

G         Em        C
Under the dog star sail
G        Em         C
Over the reefs of moonshine
G         Em        C
Under the skies of fall
Bm            C                   D
North, north west, the stones of Faroe

Under the Arctic fire
Over the seas of silence
Hauling on frozen ropes
For all my days remaining

Em      C              D
   But would north be true?

{ Chorus : "ehhhh..." }
All colours bleed to red
Asleep on the ocean's bed
Drifting in empty seas
For all my days remaining

Em      C              D
   But would north be true?
Em                C
   Why should I?
                 D
   Why should I cry for you?

G            Em7    C
Dark angels follow me
G       Em7     C
Over a godless sea
G             Em      C
Mountains of endless falling,
Bm   C             D
For all my days remaining,

Em  C             D
   What would be true?

Em           C             D
Sometimes I see your face,
Em                 C               D
The stars seem to lose their place
Em          C            D
Why must I think of you?
Em           C
Why must I?
           G
Why should I?
             Em       C
Why should I cry for you?
G             Em       C
Why would you want me to?
G                 Em       C
And what would it mean to say,
Bm        C               D
That, "I loved you in my fashion"?

G              D
What would be true?
Em            C
Why should I?
              D              G
Why should I cry for you?

Fsus2  C  G

Chords used:
  G      320003
  Fsus2  033011
  C      032010
  Em     022000
  Bm     224432
  D      x00232
  Em7    020000